About Comrie
Comrie is just over an hour from both Glasgow and Edinburgh, in picturesque Perthshire. It sits at the convergence of three sparkling rivers and is surrounded by rolling hills, farmers’ fields, and woodlands. Scotland’s major east-west route, the A85, passes through the village, allowing easy access to anywhere you’d like to go.

Food and Drink
Comrie boasts a small but satisfying array of shops and restaurants. The Café Comrie opposite Ballacraine offers hearty soups and sandwiches, while the Royal Hotel and Deil’s Cauldron Restaurant provide fine dining. Good food is also on offer at the Comrie Hotel, which features an adjoining pub. If you’re in the mood to take-away, the local Fish and Chips shop is available for your fast-food needs (deep fried Mars bar anyone?).


When you need groceries they aren't far away as the Nisa convenience store occupies the same building as Ballacraine. Hansen's Kitchen and Campbell's Bakery and the Fruit Shop offer a delicious range of locally made breads, jams, soups and assorted goods.


What to see and do

We are right in the heart of the village, just down the road from the White Church. The White Church is white, but it is not a church. It's been the village's community centre for the past 50 years.  Go in and check out the flambeaux pole on display (it's right beside the flag of Ontario - you'll understand why when you see the signs when you enter the village). This is also a great spot for weddings so it's not unusual to spot a bride or a bagpiper on a Saturday. The village also has a wonderful pipe band. If you time things right you'll be there for a concert.  (On most Thursday evenings you can also hear them practicing just down the road.)


The village also has a kilt-making shop that also sells clan and Scottish bits and pieces. It's well worth a visit to the House of Tartan. You just might pick up a Keep Calm and Comrie On t-shirt!


Comrie’s history and geography set the stage for some unique landmarks and tourist destinations. Just south of the village lies the Cultybraggan Camp, which was set up during the Second World War to house POWs. It is now community-owned and is open for guided tours on selected days during the summer and self-guided visits the rest of the year.

Also south of the village is the Auchingarrich Wildlife Park, a former farm converted into a home for a menagerie of animals, both local and exotic. It also features an indoor play area suitable for young children and rainy days. Some of the park’s sheep demo the source of “tartan wool”, with their coats growing in the patterns and styles of Scottish regalia.

On the other side of the village, you can make your way to the famed Deil’s (Devil’s) Cauldron, a waterfall accessible by one of many hiking trails. Local legend claims the waterfall is inhabited by vengeful water spirits. Whether or not you find any, it also lends its name to a popular local restaurant – the spirits there are less vengeful when taken in moderation.

In addition to numerous hiking trails, many bike trails can be found in the area. Bikes and other equipment may be rented from the Comrie Croft bike shop just outside the village. They also have trails for the adventurous. 

Golfers will enjoy the Comrie Golf Club. The nine-hole course is open to members and non-members. It's a good place for lunch and if you’re lucky they’ll be serving sticky-toffee pudding that day too. Serious about golf? Talk to us. Gleneagles is just down the road and St. Andrews not much farther. St. Fillans has a great course and Crieff has some of our favourites including the Crieff Golf Club.


On your way to Crieff, you'll come across the Famous Grouse Experience. Great place to learn about how whisky is made and get a bottle personalized on the spot for a special someone. It's Scotland's oldest continuously operating distillery. 

A Munro called Ben Chonzie isn’t far from the village and is popular among hikers. Animal watchers may also be interested in its reputation as a home for mountain hares. If you’re not up for a such a long climb, an obelisk called the Melville Monument sits atop a smaller hill and provides a wonderful view of the village. Want to get some expert help with your outdoor activities? Try Do It Outdoors for all kinds of outdoorsy stuff. 


Looking for a castle? We highly recommend Stirling Castle. Even if it wasn't relatively nearby, it would still be our favourite.


We're only just over an hour from both Edinburgh and Glasgow, so it's worth considering a jaunt to them too. (Maybe not in the same day though as you'll find them in opposite directions.) Don't miss the Willow Tea Rooms in Glasgow and the Camera Obscura in Edinburgh.


Find out all about what Scotland has to offer at Visit Scotland.